2002-10-02 / Obituaries

Arlyn Fishkin

Arlyn Fishkin died peacefully on Saturday, September 14, 2002 at Benedictine Hospital in Kingston, NY, after a long illness. She was born June 4, 1942 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to the late Edith and Morris Fishkin. She received her masters degree from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and taught high school art for 20 years. She also owned a jewelry store and busy production studio in Milwaukee where several other stores carried her original designs. She loved gemology and used many types of stones and colored glass in her work. She was best known for her innovative designs in silver and gold. Her free flowing unique creations were influenced by African, Haitian and Native American art. Her many international design awards include: The International Pearl Design Contest Judges’ Award in Tokyo, 1980; The Women in Design National Artist of Honor Award, 1981; and The Johnson Metthey Platinum Design Competition Award, 1984, to name a few. She was an avid traveler and went on 3 safaris in Africa, lived a short time in Paris and traveled extensively in Europe, New Guinea and the U.S. She worked with Ashanti artists in Ghana and Yoruba bronzeworkers in Nigeria.

She moved to Cold Spring in 1986 and opened a jewelry store in The Bijou at 50 Main Street and then moved to 104 Main Street, for a total of ten years. She participated in the mentoring program at Haldane School and had a few private art students. She moved to Rosendale in 1996 and then High Falls, NY. She was an inspiration to her many friends for her courage and good humor in the face of a devastating illness.

She is predeceased by her brother, Bruce and is survived by her nephews, Caleb and Joshua Fishkin, who live in Conneticut, and by several cousins in Milwaukee.

A memorial service to celebrate Arlyn’s life was held Sunday, September 29, at the Vivekananda Retreat, 101 Legget Road in Stone Ridge, NY.


Return to top

Weekly Poll

Who are you rooting for in the World Series?
.








The below video is sponsored by The Church on the Hill.

Reasons why people don't go to Church from from the Public Square on Vimeo.